Scientia PhD Student

Field of research: Oceanography

Contact details:
Phone9385 9766
Email: hannah.dawson@unsw.edu.au

Hannah completed her BSc in Geology at the University of Western Australia in 2013 before graduating with a Master’s of Professional Engineering (Environmental) in 2016. Hannah’s master’s research was completed with the Institute for Marine and Antarctic studies in Hobart and focussed on the physical and biological characteristics of Southern Ocean mesoscale eddies. Hannah started her PhD with UNSW in March 2020 after working as a consultant environmental engineer for three years. Her research interests include physical and biological oceanography, climate-ocean interactions, Antarctic coastal circulation and ice shelf melting. Her research is currently focused on Antarctic shelf circulation and connectivity using Lagrangian particle tracking techniques.

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Scientia PhD

Field of research: Ocean-Climate Dynamics

Contact details:
Phone: 9385 9766
Email: m.huguenin-virchaux@unsw.edu.au

Both my Bachelor's degree in Earth Science and my Master's degree in Atmospheric and Climate Science from the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Zurich (ETHZ) in Switzerland provided me with a comprehensive knowledge in mathematics, physics, biology and earth sciences. To broaden my knowledge in climate research and my great interest in ocean sciences, I undertook a research practicum at UNSW to work on my Master thesis titled "Mechanisms Driving Ocean Heat Uptake over ENSO Events". In this project, I simulated my own idealised ENSO events in a global ocean model and investigated processes that lead to vertical heat exchanges during these events. After completion of my Master's degree, I led a collaborative research project between ETHZ and MeteoSwiss on changes in the atmospheric circulation over Central Europe before returning to UNSW for my PhD studies.

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Scientia PhD

Contact details:
Phone: 9385 9766
Email: r.isphording@unsw.edu.au

Rachael completed her B.Sc. in Applied Meteorology at Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University and her M.Sc. in Geological Sciences at The University of Texas at Austin, both in the U.S. Her master's thesis focused on identifying drivers of long-term changes in large-scale tropical circulation patterns (i.e. the Hadley and Walker Circulations), specifically over the Amazon and Congo Rainforests. In 2019, Rachael was awarded the prestigious Scientia PhD. Scholarship at UNSW to study flooding rains, droughts, and human security in a changing climate. For her PhD research, Rachael hopes to address current climate modelling limitations for understanding magnified drought-flood cycles to improve adaptation and risk management strategies. In addition to furthering her research, Rachael is interested in science communication and outreach. In her spare time, she enjoys hiking, kayaking, sailing, yoga, paddle boarding and exploring new places.

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PhD Student

Field of research: Oceanography

Zhi started his PhD in August 2018. His research focus is on the formation, variability and mechanisms controlling Subantarctic Mode Water in the Southern Ocean. Particularly the interannual variation of the annual subduction rate in the Southern Ocean by using a gridded Argo product.

Zhi graduated from Ocean University of China with a Masters degree of science in 2018. During his Masters, Zhi worked on the response of the tropical Indian Ocean to GHGs and aerosols. Zhi's master thesis focussed on the subduction of the SAMW and AAIW in the Southern Ocean.

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Contact details:
Email: jennifer.mccrindle@unsw.edu.au

Jenni worked in education for a decade and she has translated her concern with outcomes for the vulnerable to applied research. She published work on the association between educational outcomes and environmental exposure to lead. Jenni is now keen to extend her work on disadvantage to investigate health risks of heatwaves and related adaptations and interventions.

Thesis: Climate and health

Jennifer started her PhD in June 2018. She is developing her research questions for her thesis. Her areas of interest are public health risks of climate change and related adaptations and interventions. Her research will explore these topics in Sydney, Australia.

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PhD

Contact details:
Phone: 9385 9766
Email: m.naserikia@unsw.edu.au

Marzie received her Master of Science in Urban Planning from Tarbiat Modares University of Tehran, Iran. She has started her PhD in April 2020 at the Climate Change Research Centre at UNSW. Her research has focused on urban heat island adaptation and mitigation, land use/ land cover planning, and investigating the effects of green infrastructures on citizens’ thermal comfort. Marzie is also interested in the application of Geographic Information Systems, remote sensing, and satellite imagery in spatial analysis of urban areas.

Thesis: The influence of urban planning indicators on the urban heat island in Sydney

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PhD Student

Field of research: Oceanography

Contact details:
Phone: 9385 9766
Email: j.neme@unsw.edu.au

Julia graduated from the University of Buenos Aires with a Licenciatura in Oceanography degree in 2019 and a thesis work analysing the relationship of the surface velocity of the Brazil current and the surface winds over the South Atlantic ocean. During her degree, she had the opportunity to travel to the University of California under a Fulbright scholarship which made her realise that international collaboration is extremely important and ultimately led to her pursue of a PhD scholarship at the University of New South Wales.

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PhD Student

Contact details:
Phone: 9385 9766
Email: phuongloan.nguyen@student.unsw.edu.au

I graduated with a degree in Environmental Science from Vietnam National University-University of Science and then continued my Masters degree in Climate Change at Climate Change Research Lab (CCRL) in Pohang University of Science and Technology (POSTECH, South Korea). I'm interested in climate extreme and hydrology, particularly drought and precipitation extreme. My current research is related to global assessment of climate variability and drought characteristics.

Thesis: The sub-daily precipitation extreme: the past and future change in its characteristics

Since heavy precipitation events are responsible for recent costly and damaging rainfall-derived floods in many parts of the world, research on sub-daily precipitation extremes, which are closely associated with flash flooding, has been gaining more attention in recent years. However, global assessments on short-duration extremes on long time scales do not exist. The aim of this research will therefore be several-fold and will aim to address the remaining questions related to sub-daily precipitation extremes.

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PhD Student

Field of research: Oceanography

Contact details:
Phone: 02 9385 9766
Email: ellie.ong@unsw.edu.au

I completed my Masters degree in Physics in the UK and am now at the CCRC, using idealised models to study ocean dynamics at the Antarctic continental margin with Prof. Matt England. I'm originally from Malaysia, but grew up in Hong Kong, and I am glad to have finally made it to Sydney!

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PhD Student

Field of research: Atmospheric Climate Dynamics

Contact details:
Phone: 02 9385 9766
Email: v.ortiz@unsw.edu.au

Valentina completed her Bachelor's degree in Physics at the Faculty of Science of Universidad de Chile, and then a Masters Degree in Physics at Heidelberg University. In 2019, she joined the Center for Scientific Studies (CECs) based in Valdivia, south of Chile. There, she started to get involved in Climate and Atmospheric Sciences and worked in dynamic models. Since 2021, she is a PhD student of the Climate Change Research Centre (CCRC), University of New South Wales (UNSW), where she works in Atmospheric Climate Dynamics under the supervision of Dr Martin Jucker and Prof. Steven Sherwood.

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PhD Student

Contact details:
Phone: 9385 9766
Email: jon.page@unsw.edu.au

Jon completed his BA in Mathematics at Pembroke College, University of Oxford, before spending some time working in the IT sector. After spending three months hiking in the USA on sabbatical, he returned to the UK where he earned a Distinction in a MSc in Hydrology and Water Resource Management at Imperial College London. Focusing on environmental hydrology, his dissertation modelled the impact of elevated atmospheric CO2 on hydrological processes in a mature oak forest. His PhD research at UNSW will be similar, this time investigating the response of grasslands to climate change.

Thesis: Lags and legacies: understanding the role of antecedent effects on grassland biomass responses to rising CO2

Grasslands are estimated to cover ~20% of the terrestrial land surface and store ~25% of the world’s soil carbon. Whether grasslands will be substantial carbon sources or sinks in the future is highly uncertain. In order to predict future responses to climate extremes, we need to resolve how strong (or not) the terrestrial carbon sink will be, as this will affect the rate of warming and, so, climate extremes. This PhD will set out to understand the complicated role of water availability in limiting grassland growth (and so carbon sink potential) in response to climate change

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PhD Student

Field of research: Heatwaves

Contact details:
Phone: 9385 9766
Email: c.pathmeswaran@student.unsw.edu.au

Charuni completed her Bachelor's in Environmental Science at the University of Colombo, Sri Lanka and her Masters in Climate Change Science and Policy at the University of Bristol, UK. For her master's dissertation, she investigated the sub-daily variability in temperature and relative humidity and their impact on heat stress. During her PhD, she hopes to examine the drivers of heatwaves and to gain an in-depth understanding of how heatwaves are changing and accurately isolating the human influence on heatwaves.

Thesis: Dissecting heatwaves: The importance of physical mechanisms and human influence

Heatwaves have increased in frequency and intensity over the years as a result of worsening anthropogenic climate change. Therefore it is important to gain an in-depth understanding of how heatwaves are changing and accurately isolating human influence on heatwaves. I hope to achieve this through my PhD while also providing invaluable knowledge to policy-makers and stakeholders. The work done during my PhD will ensure that the Centre continues to be at the forefront of thought leadership and policy surrounding climate change and its impacts. I also believe that our research findings will enable communities to be better prepared through effective adaptation policies in the future.

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PhD Student

Field of research: Role of tropical clouds in the large scale circulations

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Phone: 9385 9766
Email: p.paul@unsw.edu.au

Preethi received her Bachelors in Physics from Kerala University, India and Masters in Meteorology from CUSAT, India. She worked on Indian Summer Monsoon Teleconnections to El-Nino Southern Oscillation and Indian Ocean Dipole at IITM, Pune, India, while pursuing her Masters. Preethi was a research student at National Centre for Polar and Ocean Sciences (NCPOR), Goa, for one year, working on the Arctic cloud changes and associated warm events. Preethi is now working on the role of tropical clouds in the large scale circulations and how clouds changes as the climate warms.

Thesis: Role of tropical clouds in the large scale circulations

The role of clouds in controlling the energy budget of the earth's atmosphere is of more practical value than the warming caused by the doubling of CO2. Slight changes in the cloud cover can have drastic effects on the net radiation. The changes in the clouds and convection patterns with the warming climate is of more importance since it can have huge and immediate effects on the climate leading to further warming or cooling of the atmosphere. Hence understanding how the clouds respond to a warming climate, and its role in the large scale circulation patterns is of considerable importance. Also, the changes in the circulation patterns affect the cloud formation as well. This understanding will help us to figure out how the clouds will respond in future, in a warming scenario.

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Honour

Field of research: Oceanography

Contact details:
Phone: 93859766
Email: m.pudig@student.unsw.edu.au

Matt is in his honours year of an Advanced Science degree at UNSW, majoring in applied mathematics, with a background in maths and physics. In his honours thesis, Matt is investigating long term asymmetries in the way the ocean responds to interannual warming and cooling, and how this might be used to improve projections from climate models. Matt hopes to continue his studies in the climate sciences in a PhD following his honours year.

Thesis: Investigating asymmetries in the response of long term ocean heat uptake to interannual variability in climate models.

Matt's proposed topic seeks to understand asymmetries in the effect of interannual and interdecadal variability of surface warming and cooling on long term trends in ocean heat uptake. Experiments have been performed with interannual, oscillatory warming and cooling perturbations at the ocean surface, and the ocean has shown a net cooling as a result. The principal mechanisms as to why this occurs are still uncertain, and clarifying them is key to our understanding of how variability will affect the future state of the ocean, as well as to improving climate predictions. More, as the magnitude of future climate extremes is intimately linked to the sensitivity of the climate today, a better understanding of the mechanisms at play in the climate system is critical to improving projections of how extreme events are likely to occur in the future. Matt also hopes to relate the asymmetries in ocean heat uptake to the effect of volcanic forcing in climate models, to better improve projections of future climate made from these models.

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PhD Student

Field of research: Urban climate, climate & health

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Phone: 02 9385 9766
Email: z3532751@ad.unsw.edu.au

Katie graduated with a BSc (Adv) from the University of Sydney in 2014, after which she completed a Master of Teaching (Secondary) at the University of Melbourne in 2015. She spent three years working full time as a mathematics teacher in both Melbourne and the UK before returning to the field of science to pursue her PhD at UNSW.

Thesis: Protecting NSW school children from air pollution

My topic aligns with the interconnections between urban climate, air pollution and heat extremes as well as the indirect impacts that these have on human health. Gaining a better understanding of how heat extremes impact air pollution will help to better protect people, specifically school children, from potential hazards encountered in the present climate.

PhD Student

Field of research: Climate & health

Contact details:
Phone: 02 9385 9766
Email: e.reycosta@unsw.edu.au

My name is Elona. I am from the South Coast of Sydney. I am a PhD candidate with the CCRC and I am working on a project that involves forecasting air pollution in Australia under various climate change scenarios with Donna Green.

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PhD Student

Field of research: Oceanography

Contact details:
Phone: 9385 9766
Email: himadri.saini@student.unsw.edu.au

I received a Bachelor's degree in Physics honors in 2015, during which I also did a two-month internship on Vertical structures of atmosphere at Indian Institute of Science (IISc), Bangalore. After that, I further went to study Masters in Atmospheric Science from Savitribai Phule Pune University (SPPU). Under this program, I did my one year dissertation at Indian Institute of Tropical Meteorology (IITM), Pune. Later after finishing my Master's in 2017, I worked at IITM as a Project Assistant for almost a year (September 2017 to July 2018). I started my PhD with CLEX at CCRC (UNSW) in August 2018.

Thesis: The Southern Ocean's response to abrupt Climate Change

The ocean plays a critical role in Carbon Cycle feedback. Recent studies suggest that in the long term, physical, chemical, and biological processes in the ocean will play a larger role than the land in climate-carbon coupling. The nature and strength of carbon cycle feedbacks are poorly understood and only crudely represented in climate models. This project leverages evidence from abrupt climate change events that occurred during the last ice age to improve predictions of the earth system response to human cause climate change. The Southern Ocean (SO) is a key region for natural air sea CO2 exchange and consequently a driver of the atmospheric CO2 levels both in modern times and in recent geological past. A little is known about how the SO responded to abrupt climate change events of the past. Work to reconstruct SO's CO2 exchange response to climate change is urgently needed to improve climate cycle feedback in climate models and to anticipate future impacts on global climate, biological productivity, and fisheries.

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PhD Student

Field of research: Oceanography

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Phone: 02 9385 9766
Email: christina.schmidt@unsw.edu.au

I'm a physical oceanographer and completed my Masters at GEOMAR in Kiel, Germany. I am currently completing my PhD with Prof Matt England using ocean models to analyse Antarctic Bottom Water formation and dynamics in a changing climate.

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Sciencia PhD

Field of research: Climate and Health

Contact details:
Phone: 9385 976
Email: tanya.singh@unsw.edu.au

After conducting her first MSc in International Development Studies (specialisation in health behaviour change and climate change adaptation in developing countries) at Wageningen University and Research, Netherlands, Tanya worked as a researcher at the climate change department of Wageningen Environmental Research. Here she focused, among others, on environmental health risk factors in South Asia. One of her latest projects was to lead an extensive heat exposure measurement campaign in Bangladesh, India and Pakistan in a low socio-economic urban setting with the goal to give advice on heat adaptation measures. Parallel to her research work in the Netherlands, Tanya started in 2018 her second Masters in Public Health (specialisation environmental health) at the renowned London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, UK. In 2019 she was awarded the prestigious Scientia PhD Scholarship at UNSW, where she is undertaking research on temperature extremes, air pollution and child health. One of her PhD projects will be analysing the impacts of the “black summer” bushfires in Australia on birth outcomes.

Thesis: Impacts of pre- and postnatal environmental risk factors on children’s health

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PhD Student

Contact details:
Email: a.stellema@unsw.edu.au

Annette has a Bachelor of Science in Physics and Physical Oceanography, with honours in Climate Science at the University of New South Wales. Her honours thesis examined how and why the circulation of the Indian Ocean is projected to change in a future of increasing greenhouse gas emissions. During her PhD, she will use Lagrangian methods to examine how the movement of tracers in the ocean is projected to change in the future.

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PhD Student

Field of research: Uncertainty in climate and regional carbon cycle projections

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Phone: 9385 9766
Email: l.teckentrup@student.unsw.edu.au

Lina has a background in Meteorology. In her Master's thesis, she compared simulated burned area of global dynamic vegetation models and subsequently worked as a research scientist at the Max Planck Institute for Meteorology in Hamburg. During her PhD, she focusses on different sources of uncertainty in carbon cycle projections, including the impact of climate variability, uncertainty in global climate model projections, and uncertainties in the parametrisations of dynamic global vegetation models when applied to regional scales.

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Sciencia PhD

Field of research: Climate and Health

Contact details:
Phone: 9385 9766
Email: c.m.waudby@student.unsw.edu.au

After graduating from the University of Hull with a Masters Degree in Physics with Medical Technology, Charlotte worked for the National Health Service as a Research Associate helping to optimise the delivery of cancer therapies and improve the efficiency of nebuliser delivered medication to cystic fibrosis patients for which she was awarded a Technology Transfer and Innovation prize for excellence. After completing work in Radiotherapy and Nuclear Medicine, Charlotte went on to conduct research at Leeds University using Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Imaging to examine biomarker linkages between cardiovascular disease and insulin resistance. In 2011, Charlotte moved to Manchester and worked as a specialist radiation dosimetrist at The Christie NHS Foundation Trust, one of the largest cancer centres in Europe. Recently awarded a prestigious Scientia Scholarship from UNSW, she is currently undertaking multi-disciplinary research involving the School of Public Health and Community Medicine and the Centre of Excellence for Climate Extremes.

Thesis: Thunderstorm asthma, physics and climate change

High pollen counts combined with severe thunderstorms have the potential to cause catastrophic epidemics of acute asthma attacks. The research will focus on improving our understanding of thunderstorm asthma events by examining thunderstorm dynamics and their interaction with asthma-causing pollen. Further, to estimate how the population risk is influenced by geographic distribution of pollen-generating plant species and its association with climate factors. Using statistical and meteorological modelling, examine in detail the links between acute asthma, weather patterns, flora distribution and the environment. Of particular interest is the role of water vapour within thunderstorms and its influence on pollen aerodynamics and fragmentation. The aims of the project are to produce a predictive tool to forecast thunderstorm asthma events, improve knowledge-transfer between climate and health scientists and advise government on implementing an early warning system for the provision of targeted health care.

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PhD Student

Field of research: Climate Dynamics

Contact details:
Phone: 9385 9766

Nicholas completed his Advanced Science degree in climate dynamics and physics in the University of New South Wales. In his honours year in the Climate Change Research Centre, he focused on paleoceanography and ran transient climate simulations with prognostic oxygen isotopes (UVic ESCM) to constrain the spatial origin of Meltwater Pulse-1A (14.5 ka) -- an episode during which sea levels rose by 15 metres in less than 400 years. In 2019 he began his PhD, running an Australian coupled model, ACCESS-ESM, to better understand past carbon cycles and hydroclimate in the Last Interglacial (LIG, 127 ka).

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PhD Student

Greeshma completed her Masters degree from the University of Hyderabad, India in Ocean and Atmospheric Sciences (2021) and her bachelor's degree in Physics from Calicut University (2019), India. She joined CCRC UNSW in 2022 as a Ph.D. student working on a project which aims in understanding extreme wind gusts and associated present and future risks in New South Wales, under the supervision of Prof. Steven Sherwood and Prof. Jason Evans.

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Masters student

After graduating from the University of Adelaide in 2021 with a degree in mathematics, a diploma in French, and a strong drive to try and strong drive to be one of the people working to understand and mitigate climate change, Isabelle commenced their M. Phil. at UNSW in 2022. Isabelle’s volunteer experience with student clubs and societies, Amnesty International, and Peer Assisted Study Sessions has cultivated in them a passion for organising, a love for collaboration, and the ability to cold call literally anyone. Academically, Isabelle is looking forward to working within the Climate Change Research Centre and CLEX to apply mathematics, statistics, and machine learning to improve our ability to forecast extreme hail events. Outside of university, Isabelle will read almost anything they can get their hands on, and loves music and op shops.

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PhD student

Sebastian graduated with a Bachelor of Advanced Science (Honours) in 2019 from UNSW, majoring in Climate Systems Science. His honours project was focused on understanding the representation of Indo-Pacific Climate variability, and related model biases in CMIP5. After graduating, he joined Weatherzone in the forecast systems team. Sebastian has now returned to UNSW to pursue a PhD.

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PhD student

Xinyue Zhang completed her master's in China in 2019 and started her PhD through the Climate Change Research Centre at UNSW in Oct 2021. During her maser period she mainly engaged in predict the geographic location of soil samples by VIS-NIR spectrum. And now she focus on remotely identifying dryland degradation at scales.

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PhD Student

Ying-Lung started his PhD in May 2022. His research focuses on investigating the contribution of ENSO and IOD to Australian rainfall and projecting its changes under a warmer climate. He completed his BSc degree in Earth System Science and MPhil in Earth and Atmospheric Sciences at the Chinese University of Hong Kong. He is interested in large-scale climate drivers, climate dynamics, and future climate projection.

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