The purpose of this project is to understand how PHC can both improve access to health care for Aborginal people released from custody and also offer greater access to and coordination of social support services for former inmates in order to improve health outcomes.

Project Short Title

SPRINT

Project Number

RMO 10316

Project Status

Completed Projects

Chief Investigator

Dr Jane Lloyd, Prof Mark Harris, Prof Eileen Baldry, Ms Elizabeth McEntyre, Ms Dea Thiele, Ms Kathy Malera Bandjalan, Prof Juanita Sherwood, Dr Penny Abbott, Prof Jennifer Reath and Dr Devon Indig

Other Investigators

Mark Harris, Eileen Baldry and Elizabeth McEntyre (School of Social Sciences, FASS), Dea Thiel and Kathy Malera Bandjalm (AMSWS), Juanita Sherwood (UTS), Penny Abbott and Jennifer Reath (UWS), Devon Indig (UNSW)

 

Rationale

Given the disproportionate rates of Aboriginal incarceration and ill health among Aboriginal people who have been in custody, strategies to improve Aboriginal access to effective and culturally appropriate interventions are urgently needed. The current paucity of dedicated programs, exacerbated by cultural and geographical barriers, and a lack of continuity of care, decreases the accessibility of suitable substance misuse, mental health and other interventions for Aboriginal people, and are likely contributing factors to their demise and risk of re-entering the criminal justice system.  The purpose of this project was to understand how primary health care can both improve access to health care for Aboriginal people released from custody and also offer greater access to and coordination of social support services for former inmates in order to improve health outcomes.

Aims

The research examined how primary health care can better meet the health care and social support needs of Aboriginal Australians transitioning from prison to the community.  This includes:

  1. understanding the health and social needs of Aboriginal Australians released from custody
  2. examining the effectiveness of in-custody, pre and post release programs in providing primary health care and social support services for Aboriginal people released from custody
  3. identifying how to improve access to primary health care for Aboriginal people released from custody. 


Design and Method

This mixed methods study included a systematic literature review, linked dataset analysis and qualitative interviews. 

  1. The systematic literature review examined the:
  • physical, mental health and social support needs of Aboriginal people released from custody and
  • impact of pre and post release programs on Aboriginal people’s access to primary health care on release from custody.
  1. The linked dataset analysis investigated among Aboriginal and non-Aboriginal former prisoners:
  • common reasons for hospital admission post release
  • frequency of hospital admissions and 
  • time between the first and second admission to hospital.
  1. The qualitative interviews with Aboriginal people who have been in contact with the criminal justice system, their families and service providers examined the barriers and facilitators to access to primary health care on release.  The findings can be accessed here.

https://bmcfampract.biomedcentral.com/articles/10.1186/s12875-015-0303-0


SPRINT:  Services and Primary health care needs for Recently released Inmates in Need of Treatment and health management

Contact

Jane Lloyd Email: j.lloyd@unsw.edu.au

Key Partners

Aboriginal Medical Service Western Sydney; School of Social Science, FASS, UNSW; UTS, UWS

Funding

APHCRI

Project lead centre
CPHCE
Project stream
Action for Equity
Project start date
Project start date
Project end date
2013