Dr Klaus Ehrmann
Adjunct Associate Professor

Dr Klaus Ehrmann

PhD  Biomedical Engineering

MSc  Machine Design

BEng  Mechatronics

Medicine & Health
School of Optometry and Vision Science

Dr Ehrmann is one of the co-founders of nthalmic technologies, a start up company based in Sydney that conducts research and product development in the field of vision correction. As the Director of Technology at nthamic, he is responsible for all technical aspects of R&D, including instrumentation, metrology and implementation of novel optical designs. He also holds a visiting appointment at the University of New South Wales through the School of Optometry and Vision Science. His professional qualifications include a BEng awarded from the Aalen University of Applied Sciences, Germany (1986); an MSc in Machine Design from the Cranfield University, UK (1988) and a PhD in Biomedical Engineering from the University of New South Wales (1997).

 

He has held engineering R&D positions in the USA, Israel, Germany, Australia and the UK. Prior to joining the University of New South Wales for his Doctoral degree, he worked for several years for the National Physical Measurement Laboratory in Germany. In his most recent position at the Brien Holden Vision Institute, Sydney, Australia, Dr Ehrmann had been responsible for instrument development and metrology for more than 20 years. He has received numerous awards for his innovative ideas, has published over 50 peer-reviewed articles, and holds a number of contact lens and instrumentation related patents. His interests concentrate on developing innovative methods and products for vision correction devices, including contact lenses and spectacles, as well as vision related measurements. Dr Ehrmann regularly presents at international conferences and has been invited to speak on topics of translational research, myopia and optical metrology. Through is extensive network within the ophthalmic industry, he remains committed to commercialise novel vision correction devices for the benefit of those in need.

Phone
57495
Location
Rupert Myers Building
  • Journal articles | 2018
    Bakaraju RC; Ehrmann K; Ho A, 2018, 'Extended depth of focus contact lenses vs. two commercial multifocals: Part 1. Optical performance evaluation via computed through-focus retinal image quality metrics', Journal of Optometry, vol. 11, pp. 10 - 20, http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.optom.2017.04.003
    Journal articles | 2015
    Bakaraju RC; Fedtke C; Ehrmann K; Ho A, 2015, 'Comparing the relative peripheral refraction effect of single vision and multifocal contact lenses measured using an autorefractor and an aberrometer: A pilot study', Journal of Optometry, vol. 8, pp. 206 - 218, http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.optom.2015.01.005
    Journal articles | 2012
    Bakaraju RC; Ehrmann K; Falk D; Ho A; Papas EB, 2012, 'Optical performance of multifocal soft contact lenses via a single-pass method', Optometry and Vision Science, vol. 89, pp. 1107 - 1118, http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/OPX.0b013e318264f3e9
    Journal articles | 2010
    Bakaraju RC; Ehrmann K; Falk D; Ho A; Papas EB, 2010, 'Physical human model eye and methods of its use to analyse optical performance of soft contact lenses', Optics Express, vol. 18, pp. 16868 - 16882, http://dx.doi.org/10.1364/OE.18.016868
    Journal articles | 2010
    Bakaraju RC; Ehrmann K; Ho A; Papas EB, 2010, 'Inherent ocular spherical aberration and multifocal contact lens optical performance', Optometry and Vision Science, vol. 87, pp. 1009 - 1022, http://dx.doi.org/10.1097/OPX.0b013e3181fbad60
    Journal articles | 2008
    Bakaraju RC; Ehrmann K; Ho A; Papas EB, 2008, 'Pantoscopic tilt in spectacle-corrected myopia and its effect on peripheral refraction', Ophthalmic and Physiological Optics, vol. 28, pp. 538 - 549, http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1475-1313.2008.00589.x
    Journal articles | 2008
    Bakaraju RC; Ehrmann K; Papas EB; Ho A, 2008, 'Finite schematic eye models and their accuracy to in-vivo data', Vision Research, vol. 48, pp. 1681 - 1694, http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.visres.2008.04.009
    Journal articles | 2008
    Ehrmann K; Ho A; Parel JM, 2008, 'Biomechanical analysis of the accommodative apparatus in primates', Clinical and Experimental Optometry, vol. 91, pp. 302 - 312, http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1444-0938.2008.00247.x
    Journal articles | 2004
    Stapleton FJ; Tan ME; Papas EB; Ehrmann K; Golebiowski B; Vega J; Holden BA, 2004, 'Corneal and conjunctival sensitivity to air stimuli', British Journal of Ophthalmology, vol. 88, pp. 1547 - 1551, http://dx.doi.org/10.1136/bjo.2004.044024
  • Conference Papers | 2000
    Ho A; Papas EB; Kaykhosrow K; Lum E; Ehrmann K, 2000, 'Dacryomeniscometry: An early attempt', in Ophthalmic Technologies X, San Jose, California USA, pp. 23 - 31, presented at Ophthalmic Technologies X, San Jose, California USA, 22 January 2000 - 23 January 2000

 The Contact Lens Society of Australia Research Award 1995, for the promotion of scientific research in the field of contact lenses in Australia.

Peter Abel Wissenschaftspreis 1998, presented by Vereinigung Deutscher Contaktlinsenspezialisten for outstanding scientific research in the field of contact lens metrology.

Da Vinci Award 2000 presented by the BCLA for “A Novel Instrument to Quantify the Tension of Upper and Lower Eyelids”.

J Lloyd Hewett Award 2009 presented by the journal Clinical and Experimental Optometry for the best original research paper “Biomechanical analysis of the accommodation apparatus in primates”.

Developing new methods to quantify the sensitivity of ocular tissues to improve diagnosis and treatment of ocular discomfort.

Investigating the manufacturing consistency and quality of contact lens manufacturing.

Characterising optical and mechanical properties of contact lens materials.

My Research Supervision

Development of an eye model to screen optical interventions for controlling myopia progression

Smart wearables - advancing myopia research through quantification of the visual environment

Utility of optical and non-optical cues by the accommodative system to decode the sign of defocus