Mrs Maryam   Bostanara
Casual Academic

Mrs Maryam Bostanara

Engineering
Civil and Environmental Engineering

Maryam Bostanara is a third-year PhD candidate at the Research Centre for Integrated Transport Innovation (rCITI) in the School of Civil and Environmental Engineering at the University of New South Wales (UNSW) under the supervision of A/Prof Taha Hossein Rashidi. She has received her BSc and MSc degrees both in Industrial Engineering (Systems optimization) from Sharif University of Technology, Iran, in 2016 and 2018, respectively. Before starting her PhD, she joined rCITI as a research assistant researching for eight months. Her passion is learning new topics and her research interests are understanding households’ behavior dynamics, data analysis, machine learning, and transport modeling with statistical and optimization tools.

Location
Room 111, Level 1, Civil and Environmental Engineering Building (H20).
  • Journal articles | 2021
    Bostanara M; Rashidi TH; Auld J; Ghasri M, 2021, 'A comparison between residential relocation timing of Sydney and Chicago residents: A Bayesian survival analysis', Computers, Environment and Urban Systems, vol. 89, http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.compenvurbsys.2021.101659
    Journal articles | 2021
    Najmi A; Bostanara M; Gu Z; Rashidi TH, 2021, 'On-street parking management and pricing policies: An evaluation from a system enhancement perspective', Transportation Research Part A: Policy and Practice, vol. 146, pp. 128 - 151, http://dx.doi.org/10.1016/j.tra.2021.02.009

In her research, she is modeling the dynamics of behavior of households. Understanding the dynamics of households’ long-term decisions is of high importance for many different fields, especially in urban transport planning. Residential relocation is one of the long-term, most important decisions made by any household. As a result, modeling the duration of residence of households and the reasons behind them have received growing attention. My research aims to develop a dynamic model of residential relocation timing by considering the potential impact of the timing of other life-course decisions and variables including vehicle, job, and education change. The research will be observing the two-way interactions between all these changes and decisions.