Conjoint Senior Lecturer

Dr John Kasinathan

medicine-health
School of Psychiatry

Research Interests:
Adolescent forensic psychiatry is a growing area at the intersection of disparate fields. Providing clinical services for mentally ill young offenders highlights major issues for clinicians and stake-holders alike. Research in this area brings new insight into one of the most interesting and innovative areas of psychiatry today.

Broad Research Areas:
Psychiatry, Forensic, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry

Qualifications:
MBBS (Hons1), MPsychiatry, FRANZCP, Cert Forensic Psych, MFMH, Cert Child Adol Psych.

Society Memberships & Professional Activities:
Fellow of the Royal Australian and New Zealand College of Psychiatrists, Member of the Faculty of Forensic Psychiatry, RANZCP; Senior Staff Specialist and Clinical Director, Justice Health, NSW Health; Visiting Psychiatrist, Forensic Services, Mental Health, ACT Health; Private Practice, Level 8, 235 Macquarie St, Sydney, 92210688.

Specific Research Keywords:
Forensic Psychiatry, Child and Adolescent Psychiatry, mental illness in young offenders, Assessing imminent aggression risk

Teaching Interests:
The high secure adolescent forensic psychiatric inpatient unit (located within the Forensic Hospital, Sydney) is the first of its kind in Australia. Medical students receive an overview of adolescent forensic psychiatry and relevant clinical formulations and risk issues will be discussed. Findings to consider include that:
1) The development of severe mental illnesses and disorders parallel vulnerability to offending in young people.
2) Complexity arising from legal, juvenile justice and health care systems may hamper much needed access to mental health care for mentally ill youth.
3) The inpatient care of mentally ill young detainees necessitates strong medical leadership, innovation, creativity and rigor.
4) Treatment needs for mentally ill young offenders encapsulate intensive psychiatric, medical, nursing, psychological, welfare, educational and functional initiatives.
5) Instruments for the assessment of risk in youth cannot be divorced from high-quality clinical judgment.

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