Conduct and integrity

UNSW students walking in morning

Conduct and integrity at UNSW

UNSW is building a positive, productive and open culture.

Our community acts with integrity, honesty and trust. We display respect, demonstrate excellence, drive innovation, build collaboration and embrace diversity.

UNSW prioritises cultural, psychological and physical safety. As members of the UNSW community, we are all accountable for our actions and we meet the principles and responsibilities of our Codes of Conduct.

Learn more about the expected standards at UNSW and what to do if you suspect a breach of our codes.

Want to speak up?
You've got our support

If you want to speak up about something you’ve seen or experienced that doesn’t feel right, we’re here to support you.

Whatever the issue, big or small, we’d like to hear about it. There are many ways you can safely speak up and get the support you need.

If you wish to raise an issue or learn more about how to raise an issue with us, you can do that here.

Frequently Asked Questions (FAQ)

The decision to raise a concern, report an issue or make a complaint is never easy, but UNSW aims to make the process as simple, fair and transparent as possible.

You can seek advice and support at any stage of the complaints process, but the following common questions and answers may help you get started.

    • There are different ways to raise a concern, report an issue, or make a complaint. Whichever one you choose, UNSW aims to help you reach a solution with a process that’s fair for everyone.

      You may raise a concern or report an issue by:

      • Raising it directly with the person (where safe and appropriate to do so) or area responsible. 
      • Making a complaint directly, in person, by email, or over the phone.
      • Giving permission to someone else to raise a concern or make a complaint on your behalf (such as a parent, friend, UNSW Security, or any member of UNSW staff).
      • Lodging your concern or making a confidential report on UNSW’s case management system, CaseIQ.
      • Issues concerning fraud, corrupt conduct or other types of serious wrongdoing should be reported here.

      If you’re a student, you should start by contacting a member of staff in your faculty or school or a student hub advisor. Staff should begin by raising it with their supervisor, a grievance officer or your HR Business Partnering team. If your complaint is about the person you would normally speak to, you can raise it with the next most senior mem

      If you are uncomfortable raising a complaint, you can ask someone to raise it on your behalf, and you can even make complaints anonymously, although this can sometimes make it difficult to follow up or investigate if we can’t get in touch with you.

      A list of contacts is available here.

    • When you make a complaint or raise a report, it will be received, acknowledged, and reviewed with fairness and respect.

      Once a complaint handler or Case Manager is assigned, they will let you know what to expect, how long it should take to resolve your concern and what sort of communication and updates you’ll receive.

      Throughout the process, in addition to the person handling your complaint/report, you have access to support services who can offer guidance and support should you need it.

    • There are many different paths to resolving a complaint.

      Where appropriate and safe to do so, UNSW encourages you to try to resolve it with the other party directly.

      If this isn’t appropriate or has been unsuccessful, UNSW can help you work out the most appropriate means based on what sort of complaint and how urgent it is, as well as the circumstances around the complaint itself.

      For example, UNSW can try to assist you with resolution directly, or it might be escalated for formal investigation and resolution or referred to an external body. In these situations, a Case Manager will also explain to you how the complaint will be handled.

    • You’ll be advised when the issue has been concluded, but the level of information you’ll get about the exact outcome may depend on the nature of your complaint, and whether aspects of the outcome are subject to privacy or confidentiality requirements.

    • It is important to know that it is not possible to appeal the decision made at the end of the complaints resolution process. You may only request an internal review because of how the complaint was handled, not because you don’t agree with the outcome and/or penalty. It’s important to remember that having your case reviewed doesn’t guarantee that the outcome will be any different.

    • At the end of the complaints or investigation process, you can request an internal review if you believe your complaint has been handled unfairly, or there is new, exceptional information that you believe will change the outcome.

      Remember, you can only request a review because of on how the complaint was handled, not because you don’t agree with the outcome and/or penalty. It’s important to remember that having your case reviewed doesn’t guarantees that the outcome will be any different.

      At the conclusion of the complaints process, you’ll receive information on how to request a review along with the written notification of outcome. To request a review, you should complete the request form in CaseIQ.

      You only have one opportunity to request an internal review of procedural fairness. If you’re still unsatisfied after the review, you can still take the matter to one of the external agencies listed below.

      You can also request help from an outside agency or lodge a complaint application with an external body at any time. In this case, if an external investigation is initiated UNSW may suspend the internal investigation pending the external investigation.

      External agencies include:

      • NSW or ACT Ombudsman
      • NSW Anti-Discrimination Board (or ACT Human Rights Commission for ADFA)
      • Australian Human Rights Commission
      • Independent Commission Against Corruption (ICAC) or ACT Integrity Commission
      • NSW or ACT Police
      • Fair Work Ombudsman
      • Australian Research Integrity Committee (ARIC)
      • National Health and Medical Research Council
      • Australian Research Council (ARC)
      • The Tertiary Education Quality and Standards Agency (TEQSA)
      • Independent Commission Against Corruption (ICAC)

      Some of these agencies require you to have lodged an internal complaint, and that the internal processes concludes before they get involved. They also have strict time limits.

    • While UNSW will aim to resolve complaints and concerns, there are situations where UNSW may not be able to progress a complaint. This could be due to:

      • not enough information,
      • an incident that falls outside the scope or time frame of policy,
      • a complaint that is misleading or intended to harm rather than address a substantive concern,
      • a complaint that seeks to bring back an issue that has already been addressed or determined,
      • A complainant’s behaviour is unreasonable.

      If your complaint can not be accepted or resolved, you will be provided with the reasons why. 

      In some cases, the complaint may also be referred to an external organisation for action.

    • UNSW aims to make the complaints process fair and transparent, which includes communicating with all parties at every stage of the complaints process.

      When you lodge a complaint, UNSW will acknowledge and respond to you in a timely manner. The person handling your complaints will be transparent with you about the process, they may discuss options for how the complaint can be handled and what the possible outcomes may be. You’ll also be advised of any delays. And if your complaint can’t be handled by the University, you’ll be advised of that as well.

      If you would like to request an update on your complaint or have other questions for the person handling your complaint, you can send a message through CaseIQ

      But please remember that unreasonable persistence, or other unreasonable behaviour can impact on the case manager’s work on your complaint and may cause unnecessary delays.

    • You may be contacted by someone who wants to discuss a complaint that has been made against you. This could be the person who has the complaint, or a member of staff at UNSW who will assist to resolve the issue between the parties involved in the first instance. You should take the opportunity to have a discussion with this person to try and find a solution.

      Sometimes, you might first learn that a complaint has been made against you when the Case Manager invites you to meet and discuss it. They will:

      • outline the concerns that have been raised, and discuss the complaint handling or investigation process; and
      • offer you an opportunity to ask questions and respond.

      It is highly recommended that you accept the invitation and meet the Case Manager to discuss the situation.

      The Case Manager will give you a written statement of concerns/allegations raised against you. You’ll be given the opportunity to respond to this and to any new material or allegations that are identified during the investigation.

      The Case Manager will then work out the next steps. If you believe the allegations are true, you’ll have the opportunity to admit to them at any point during the process. Otherwise, the matter will proceed to an investigation.

      If you need support or are experiencing stress, anxiety or any other negative emotional effects, you can call the 24/7 Mental Health Support: call (02) 9385 5418. If you are an international student offshore, call +61 (2) 8905 0307.

    • If someone has asked you to make a complaint on their behalf, contact the Conduct & Integrity Office or any of the other support services for advice.

    • You can more information about the value UNSW places on complaints here.

      You can find the UNSW Complaints Management and Investigations Policy and Procedure here.

    • You can find the UNSW Complaints Management and Investigations Policy here.

    • Procedural fairness is concerned with the process followed by a decision maker to reach a decision being fair and reasonable, rather than the actual outcome reached. This includes:

      • advising the person of the case against them and giving them a fair and impartial hearing including making sure they have all the necessary details of the complaint and a proper opportunity to state their case
      • Ensuring findings and decisions are based on logical and relevant evidence and that reasons are given for that decision
      • Making sure that those involved in deciding the outcome of a complaint don’t have any bias or conflict of interest
    • You can request help from an outside agency or lodge a complaint application with an external body at any time. In this case, UNSW may decide to suspend the internal investigation pending the external investigation.

      External agencies include:

      • NSW or ACT Ombudsman
      • NSW Anti-Discrimination Board (or ACT Human Rights Commission for ADFA)
      • Australian Human Rights Commission
      • Independent Commission Against Corruption (ICAC) or ACT Integrity Commission
      • NSW or ACT Police
      • Fair Work Ombudsman
      • Australian Research Integrity Committee (ARIC)
      • National Health and Medical Research Council
      • Australian Research Council (ARC)
      • The Tertiary Education Quality and Standards Agency (TEQSA)
      • Independent Commission Against Corruption (ICAC)

      Please note that some of these agencies require you to have lodged a complaint to UNSW before they get involved and may have strict time limits.

    • UNSW values timeliness, transparency, and respect in our complaints management process. Those managing complaints are obliged to manage expectations by being clear about the complaint process, possible outcomes and expected timelines. You’ll be contacted if there’s a delay in the process, or if your complaint can’t be handled by UNSW.

      It’s also important to know that UNSW assesses and prioritises complaints based on the seriousness of their impact and how urgent they are. If there is an immediate risk to safety or security the response will be immediate and will be escalated appropriately. In some cases, this might affect the time it takes to resolve your complaint.

      If you are becoming frustrated with the time taken to resolve your complaint, you can contact the case manager for more information using the online UNSW Complaints Portal. However, please remember that all parties involved are expected to show courtesy and respect. Unreasonable persistence, or other unreasonable behaviour can significantly affect the progress and efficiency of the case manager’s work, their wellbeing and safety.

      You can request help from an outside agency or lodge a complaint application with an external body at any time. In this case, UNSW may decide to suspend the internal investigation pending the external investigation.

      External agencies include:

      • NSW or ACT Ombudsman
      • NSW Anti-Discrimination Board (or ACT Human Rights Commission for ADFA)
      • Australian Human Rights Commission
      • Independent Commission Against Corruption (ICAC) or ACT Integrity Commission
      • NSW or ACT Police
      • Fair Work Ombudsman
      • Australian Research Integrity Committee (ARIC)
      • National Health and Medical Research Council
      • Australian Research Council (ARC)
      • The Tertiary Education Quality and Standards Agency (TEQSA)
      • Independent Commission Against Corruption (ICAC)

      Some of these agencies require you to have lodged an internal complaint before they get involved and have strict time limits.

      If you believe your complaint wasn’t handled fairly, you can also request a review at the end of the complaints process. You can also request a review if you believe there is new, exceptional information that will change the outcome. However, having the case reviewed does not guarantee that the outcome will be any different.

      If you are experiencing stress, anxiety, or any other negative emotional effects, you can call the 24/7 Mental Health Support: call (02) 9385 5418. If you are an international student offshore, call +61 (2) 8905 0307 instead.

    • No.

      Bullying someone who has made a complaint is called ‘victimisation’. It could include threats, intimidation, or penalties such as lower grades. Victimisation is not acceptable at UNSW and will result in disciplinary action. Depending on the nature of the complaint, it may even be against the law.

      The University will make all reasonable effort to protect you and anyone involved from adverse consequences as a result of making a complaint.

      In addition, UNSW will make all reasonable efforts to protect the identity of you and everyone else involved with the complaints process. Again, we’ll let you know if this won’t be possible due to procedural fairness requirements.

    • You’ll be advised when the issue has been concluded. However, the level of information you’ll get about the exact outcome may depend on a few things, including:

      • the nature of your complaint, and
      • whether aspects of the outcome are subject to privacy or confidentiality requirements.
    • There are many different ways to make a complaint. Whichever one you choose, UNSW aims to help you reach a solution that’s fair for everyone, with as little negative impact as possible on your study or working relationships.

      In the case of a complaint that doesn’t involve another person’s conduct or integrity, you might consider:

      • Making a complaint to UNSW directly, in person, by email or over the phone,
      • Lodging a complaint directly, through the UNSW complaints portal, or
      • In the case of injury, giving permission to a first responder, UNSW Security, UNSW Counselling or any member of UNSW staff to make a complaint on your behalf.

      A complete list of links and phone numbers can be found here.

    • Your complaint and all information on file will be kept confidential and handled according to the Privacy and Personal Information Protection Act 1998 (NSW), Information Privacy Act 2014 (ACT) and the UNSW Privacy Policy.

      UNSW will make all reasonable effort to protect your identity (and that of everyone else involved with the complaints process). Any information we have will only be available to authorised people who are actively involved in the complaints handling or investigation process or as required by law.

    • Yes. UNSW will respect your wishes if you want to remain anonymous. However, please keep in mind that staying anonymous can make it difficult to investigate a complaint, particularly if nobody knows how to contact you for more information.

      You can anonymously make complaint or lodge a report by creating an email address that does not identify you. 

      You can lodge an anonymous complaint here.

    • You and everyone else involved in the complaints process is bound and protected by confidentiality and privacy laws. 

      Your information, and any other details collected during the complaints process will be handled according to the provisions of the Privacy and Personal Information Protection Act 1998 (NSW), Information Privacy Act 2014 (ACT) and the UNSW Privacy Policy. This means the information will only be available to authorised people who are actively involved in the complaints handling process or as required by law.

      If you want to remain anonymous, UNSW will accept anonymous complaints where possible, including by email, but it may be easier to resolve the complaint if we know who you are and how to contact you.

    • Case IQ is UNSW's secure system designed to assist you in reporting issues including but not limited to: 

      • Raising a complaint or concern with UNSW.
      • Raising a suspected breach of UNSW's Codes of Conduct.
      • Reporting academic and behavioural misconduct of UNSW staff and students.
      • Reporting and/or seeking support for instances of Gendered Violence. 
      • Requesting an Internal Review.

      If you would like to make a report of Serious Wrongdoing, Your Call provides a confidential service that is independent of UNSW. You can make a confidential and anonymous report on 1300 790 228 between 9.00 a.m. and 12.00 a.m. (midnight) Monday to Friday (AEST) except public holidays; OR lodge a report at any time online using the Organisation ID: UNSW.

      Reports of this kind are referred to as Public Interest Disclosures and are managed under the Public Interest Disclosures Policy & Procedure.

    • We have helpful guides to assist you in submitting your concern, complaint or report via Case IQ.

      Use any of the buttons & quick links contained within this website to access Case IQ. It is a single system, so all links will take you to Case IQ.

      You have two options to access Case IQ:

      • Single Sign On (SSO): Case IQ has been integrated with UNSW staff and student systems so that Case IQ recognises your zID login credentials. 
      • The Portal: The Case IQ Portal is for members of the public, as well as those who wish to report anonymously. There is the option to create a non-UNSW username and password to be able to access your prior submissions and a message board to receive updates on your submissions.
    • No. Case IQ can be used by anyone! If you are a member of the public/ a non-UNSW staff member or student, you can access Case IQ by the Portal.

    • Use the following guides to assist you further in submitting your concern/ report via Case IQ. 

      For those logging in using their UNSW zID and password, use the ‘Add Case’ button in the top left corner of your screen to launch a submission form.

      For those using the Portal, you will be presented with a landing page which gives you the option to complete an online form, email your concern or report to the Coordination, Advice & Support Team, or login using a self-generated username and password if you are a returning user.  

      For staff, you can find further information about Case IQ, it’s functionality and helpful guides on SharePoint.

    • If you navigate away from Case IQ while you are completing a new submission form, Case IQ will not save this form and you will have to start a brand-new form.

      Case IQ will throw a warning pop-up before you navigate away or click to close your browser.

      Please note: Case IQ will not throw a warning pop-up if you navigate away from the ‘Add files’ and the ‘Add parties’ pages, so be mindful to enter all required information and click ‘submit’ before navigating to another page in Case IQ.

    • The previous system (Insight CRM portal) is no longer in use for raising concerns or making reports. It has now been replaced by Case IQ.

      Your case and related information has been migrated to Case IQ, with the original reference number.

      As such, we request that you no longer use Insight CRM for case correspondence. Instead, email your case manager directly. They will advise you of how to correspond via Case IQ once your case has been successfully migrated to Case IQ.

      If you have replied to an email from Insight CRM regarding your case or have included trackincrm@unsw.edu.au in your case correspondence, your email will be redirected to your Case Manager for action. They will correspond with you via email, until your case has been successfully migrated to Case IQ.

    • For UNSW staff & students only: If your concern relates to your zID and password, please contact UNSW IT

      For UNSW staff only: You can find Case IQ resources and instructions on our SharePoint site.  

      If you require instructions on completing a submission form in Case IQ, you can access our helpful guides here.

      If you are still experiencing issues with Case IQ and require support, please contact the Conduct & Integrity Office at caseiq@unsw.edu.au

    • If your life or someone else’s life is at risk, call 000 immediately. If you are on campus or overseas, you can also contact UNSW Campus Security on +61 (02) 9385 6666.

      For 24/7 Mental Health Support: call (02) 9385 5418. If you are an international student offshore, call +61 (2) 8905 0307 instead.

      Each building also has Emergency Control Officers (ECOs), including first aid officers.

      A complete list of emergency contacts can be found here.

      You can disclose an issue to any of these people for them to lodge a complaint on your behalf.

    • No matter who the complaint is about, the process of making the complaint is similar.

      As a first step, you might try to resolve the issue or dispute directly with the other student (but only if it’s safe and appropriate for you to do so).

      If you want some support in raising the concern or complaint, first go to your faculty or school. They should be able to direct you to the relevant person or area for help.

      Information and advice is also available from:

      You can also make a complaint, or report misconduct or integrity issues (such as cheating) to UNSW directly, in person, by email, over the phone or online through the UNSW complaints portal Case IQ.

    • No matter who the complaint is about, the process of making the complaint is basically the same.

      As a first step, you should try to resolve the issue or dispute directly with the staff member (but only if it’s safe and appropriate for you to do so).

      You can also:

      • Make a complaint to UNSW directly, in person, by email or over the phone.
      • Give permission to a first responder, UNSW Security, UNSW Counselling or any member of UNSW staff to make a complaint on your behalf.
      • Lodge a complaint directly, through the UNSW complaints portal, and
      • Report misconduct or Integrity issues confidentially through SpeakUp and Your Call.

      If you want some support in raising the concern or complaint, first go to your faculty or school. They should be able to direct you to the relevant person or area for help. If the complaint concerns someone you would normally go to for help (such as your tutor or lecturer), you can speak with the next most senior staff member, who will handle the complaint or refer it to another supervisor or manager at an appropriate level.

      Information and advice is also available from:

    • UNSW has a number of support networks that can help you make that decision.

      If you’re concerned with the student’s immediate safety:

      • Call 000. If you are on campus or overseas, you can also contact UNSW Campus Security on +61 (02) 9385 6666.
      • For 24/7 Mental Health Support, call (02) 9385 5418. If you are an international student offshore, call +61 (2) 8905 0307 instead.

      If you think the issue is a matter of misconduct, cheating or plagiarism, you can contact the Conduct & Integrity Office for advice. Otherwise, speak with Student Support Services or Arc.

      If you’re an Higher Degree Research (HDR) Candidates or research staff, you might also seek advice from your School’s Postgraduate Coordinator, the Head of School or a Research Integrity Advisor (RIA).

      If someone tells you about an incident of sexual misconduct, you should report it using the Gendered Violence Reporting Portal, even if they have asked you not to. However, you mustn’t disclose their identity (even indirectly) without their consent.

      Any of these teams can advise on whether something should be reported, as well as next steps in making a complaint.

    • What happens to the information?

      There are two things to know about information recorded during the management of a complaint or report.

      Firstly, it’s important to know that UNSW keeps and maintains records about complaints and investigation according to its legal obligations. Keeping records of relevant details in a systematic way allows us to:

      • effectively manage complaints and investigations
      • easily retrieve information for mandatory reporting and analysis
      • identify and monitor trends
      • measure the quality of the complaint handling process and service; and 
      • provide data insights for continuous improvement.

      Maintaining a robust record at each stage of the complaints handling process also lets us track the progress of the complaint, know who is involved and avoid duplicating effort.

      It’s also important to know that the information you provide will only be available to authorised people who are actively involved in the complaints handling process or as required by law.

      Everyone involved in the complaints management and investigation process is bound and protected by confidentiality and privacy laws. Your information, and any other details collected during the complaints process, will be kept confidential and handled according to the provisions of the Privacy and Personal Information Protection Act 1998 (NSW), Information Privacy Act 2014 (ACT) and the UNSW Privacy Policy.

    • You and everyone else involved in the complaints process is bound and protected by confidentiality and privacy laws.

      Your information, and any other details collected during the complaints process will be kept confidential and handled according to the provisions of the Privacy and Personal Information Protection Act 1998 (NSW), Information Privacy Act 2014 (ACT) and the UNSW Privacy Policy. This means the information will only be available to authorised people who are actively involved in the complaints handling process or as required by law.

    • There are two things to know about information recorded during a complaint and the subsequent investigation.

      Firstly, it’s important to know that UNSW keeps and maintains records about complaints in accordance with relevant legal obligations. Systematic records of relevant details in a systematic way allows us to:

      • easily retrieved information for mandatory reporting and analysis
      • identify and monitor trends
      • measure the quality of the complaint handling process and service, and
      • provide data insights for continuous improvement.

      Maintaining a robust record at each stage of the complaints handling process also lets us track the progress of the complaint, know who is involved and avoid duplicating effort.

      On the other hand, it’s also important to know that the information will only be available to authorised people who are actively involved in the complaints handling process or as required by law.

      Everyone involved in the complaints process is bound and protected by confidentiality and privacy legislation. Your information, and any other details collected during the complaints process, will be kept confidential and handled according to the provisions of the Privacy and Personal Information Protection Act 1998 (NSW), Information Privacy Act 2014 (ACT) and the UNSW Privacy Policy.

    • You can ask for advice or assistance at any stage of a complaints resolution or investigation process. The complaint handler or Case Manager will be able to advise you on the process being undertaken. Throughout the process you may access support services who can offer guidance and support, should you need it.

      Students might seek advice from:

      • Member of staff from your school or faculty
      • The Student Support Team
      • Arc (UNSW Student Life)
      • The Conduct & Integrity Office.

      Staff might seek advice from:

      • their supervisor/manager/Head of School/ Human Resources Business Partnering Team
      • UNSW’s Employee Assistance Program (EAP) provider
      • An external Complaint Officer
      • Your representative, such as a union representative.

      HDR candidates and research staff might seek advice from:

      • Your School’s Postgraduate Coordinator
      • Head of School
      • Research Integrity Advisor (RIA)
      • The Conduct and Integrity Office

      Note, if the complaint involves an immediate risk of harm to humans, animals or the environment, contact Emergency Services or UNSW Research Ethics and Compliance Support, where appropriate.

    • You can ask for advice or assistance at any stage of a complaints resolution or investigation process. The complaint handler or Case Manager will be able to advise you on the process being undertaken. Throughout the process you may access a range of support services who can offer guidance and support, should you need it.

      You can also nominate a support person at any stage of the complaints process. This could be a trusted work colleague or fellow student who isn’t directly involved in the issue. It could also be a family member, a union representative or (in some cases) a legal representative. The support person can attend meetings with you and provide advice or support about written documents and processes. However, they cannot advocate on your behalf and must maintain confidentiality. See section 8.3 of the Complaints Management and Investigations Procedure for further details. 

      UNSW also has internal and external support networks for people making a complaint.

      Students can seek support from:

      • The Student Support Team
      • Arc (UNSW Student Life)
      • The Conduct and Integrity Office

      Staff might seek support from:

      • your supervisor/manager/Head of School
      • UNSW’s Employee Assistance Program (EAP) provider
      • An external Complaint Officer
      • Your representative, such as an employee union.

      HDR candidates and research staff might seek advice from:

      • Your School’s Postgraduate Coordinator
      • Head of School
      • Research Integrity Advisor (RIA)
      • The Conduct and Integrity Office

      Depending on the nature of your complaint, you might also need to seek support from one of the Speak Up services, such as a Gendered Violence Officer or Your Call whistleblowing services.

      If you are experiencing stress, anxiety or any other negative emotional effects, you can call the 24/7 Mental Health Support: call (02) 9385 5418. If you are an international student offshore, call +61 (2) 8905 0307 instead.

    • UNSW has internal and external support networks for people making a complaint. They can advise or support you at any stage of the complaints process.

      A list of support services is available here

      If you are experiencing stress, anxiety or any other negative emotional effects, you can call the 24/7 Mental Health Support: call (02) 9385 5418. If you are an international student offshore, call +61 (2) 8905 0307 instead.

      You can also nominate a support person at any stage of the complaints process. This could be a trusted work colleague or fellow student who isn’t directly involved in the issue. It could also be a family member, a union representative or (in some cases) a legal representative. The support person can attend meetings with the you and provide advice or support about written documents and processes. They must maintain confidentiality. The support person cannot advocate on behalf of you. See section 8.3 of the Complaints Management and Investigations Procedure for further details.

    • Contract cheating is against the law and a breach of the Student Code of Conduct. Plagiarism software makes it very easy to detect, and even if you aren’t caught by UNSW, you may be at risk of blackmail or worse.

      While UNSW doesn’t condone cheating, students who have been approached by or engaged a contract cheating service shouldn’t be scared to come forward and get help.

      Contact the Conduct and Integrity Office. They’ll be able to talk you through the options.

    • Cheating can carry serious penalties, but not all cheating is intentional. Sometimes students learn or develop poor study practices, or misuse technology, in a way that seems like cheating — and can become cheating if not corrected early on.

      If you feel comfortable talking with the student about their behaviour, you may be able to encourage them to improve their study practices. If not, you can contact your tutor or lecturer who may investigate further.

      If you’re an HDR candidate or research staff, you might also seek advice from your School’s Postgraduate Coordinator, the Head of School or a Research Integrity Advisor (RIA).

      You can also contact the Conduct and Integrity Office. They’ll be able to guide you through the options.

    • UNSW has a number of support networks that can help you make that decision.

      If you’re concerned with their immediate safety:

      Call 000. If you are on campus or overseas, you can also contact UNSW Campus Security on +61 (02) 9385 6666.

      For 24/7 Mental Health Support, call (02) 9385 5418. If you are an international student offshore, call +61 (2) 8905 0307 instead.

      If you think the issue is a matter of misconduct, such as a breach of the StudentStaff or Research Code of Conduct, you can contact the Conduct & Integrity Office for advice. Otherwise, you can speak with:

      • an external Complaint Officer,
      • Human Resources (HR),
      • UNSW’s Employee Assistance Program (EAP) provider, or
      • your representative, such as an employee union.

      If you’re an HDR candidate or research staff, you might also seek advice from your School’s Postgraduate Coordinator, the Head of School or a Research Integrity Advisor (RIA).

      If someone tells you about an incident of sexual misconduct, you should report it using the Sexual Conduct Reporting Portal, even if they have asked you not to. However, you mustn’t disclose their identity (even indirectly) without their consent.

      Any of these teams can advise on whether something should be reported, as well as next steps in making a complaint.

    • If you’re concerned with their (or someone else's) immediate safety:

      • Call 000,
      • If you are on campus or overseas, you can also contact UNSW Campus Security on +61 (02) 9385 6666.

      If you think the issue is a matter of misconduct, such as a breach of the Student, Staff or Research Code of Conduct, you can contact the Conduct & Integrity Office for advice. If you are a student, you may want to speak with Student Support Services or Arc. Any of these teams can advise on whether something should be reported, as well as next steps in making a complaint.

      If someone tells you about an incident of sexual misconduct, you should report it using Case IQ or the Gendered Violence reporting portal, even if they have asked you not to. However, you mustn’t disclose their identity (even indirectly) without their consent.

    • If you’re concerned with someone’s immediate safety:

      • Call 000,
      • If you are on campus or overseas, you can also contact UNSW Campus Security on +61 (02) 9385 6666.

      If you think the issue is a matter of misconduct, such as a breach of the StudentStaff or Research Code of Conduct, you can contact the Conduct & Integrity Office for advice. Otherwise, speak with Student Support Services or Arc. Any of these teams can advise on whether something should be reported, as well as next steps in making a complaint.

      If you witness an incident of sexual misconduct, you should report it using the Sexual Conduct Reporting Portal, even if you don’t know the identity of the people involved. Even if you do know the identity of the subject of the report, you mustn’t disclose it (even indirectly) without their consent.

    • For more detail on handling complaints, refer to the Complaints, Reports & Investigations Management at UNSW SharePoint site (For UNSW Staff only).

    • For more detail on handling complaints, refer to the Complaints, Reports & Investigations Management at UNSW SharePoint site (For UNSW Staff only).

    • A complaint is a concern or matter raised about UNSW people, operations, activities, services, or processes for which a response or resolution is sought or required. Complaints at UNSW are generally categorised based on type, the level of seriousness and complexity, and these factors also go towards determining how they will be managed. They can be about:

      a)   UNSW management decisions, academic, research or administrative matters

      b)   misapplication of policy/procedures or failure of service provision, denial of procedural fairness, failure to provide rights, failing to consider relevant matters, wrong advice leading to detriment, and negligence

      c)   allegations about an individual’s conduct or alleged breaches of UNSW’s Codes of Conduct, including ethical and integrity issues such as plagiarism, unethical or biased marking, conflicts of interest, fraud, dishonesty, improper favouritism, discrimination, bullying, harassment and gendered violence.

    • General enquiries, requests for information or the provision of feedback will not usually be considered a complaint. 

      A complaint is distinct from a review of an action or decision, which follows a documented review process under the applicable procedure. Examples include the Enterprise Agreements (EAs) which provide a dispute resolution process for staff for certain matters, and the Review of Results process for students.

    • To determine if something is a complaint, ask yourself:

      • Is this something that I am dissatisfied with, and that UNSW has the power to change or enforce?
      • Is person making the complaint looking for a response or resolution from UNSW?

      If the answer is ‘yes’ to both these questions, then it is probably a complaint. If you’re still unsure, you can check the policy and procedure here (link tbc), or ask one of the following people for advice:

      For students:

      • Staff member at the school or faculty
      • The Student Support Team
      • Arc (UNSW Student Life)
      • The Conduct & Integrity Office.

      For staff:

      • your supervisor/manager/Head of SchoolHuman Resources
      • UNSW’s Employee Assistance Program (EAP) provider
      • An external Complaint Officer
      • Your representative, such as an employee union.

      For HDR candidates and research staff:

      • Your School’s Postgraduate Coordinator
      • Head of School
      • Research Integrity Advisor (RIA)
      • The Conduct and Integrity Office.
    • UNSW has an external independent whistleblowing service for making Public Interest Disclosures (PIDs) of serious wrongdoing such as:

      • corrupt conduct including fraud or serious conflicts of interest;
      •  serious maladministration;
      • Serious and substantial waste of public money
      • serious privacy contravention
      • serious public information and state records contraventions

      Your Call provides a confidential service that is independent of UNSW. You can make a confidential and anonymous report on 1300 790 228 between 9.00 a.m. and 12.00 a.m. (midnight) Monday to Friday (AEST) except public holidays; OR lodge a report at any time online using the Organisation ID: UNSW.

      Reports of this kind are referred to as Public Interest Disclosures (PIDs) and are managed under the Public Interest Disclosures Policy & Procedure.