Overview

MATH3051 is a Mathematical Level III course.  See the course overview below. 

Units of Credit: 6

Prerequisites: 12 UOC of second year mathematics courses, including MATH2011 or MATH2111 or MATH2069 (DN).

Cycle of offering: Term 3

Graduate attributes: The focus of this course is developing an awareness of the topics listed in the syllabus so that the theory can be used in applications. Proofs in the course will focus on facilitating familiarity with key objects and the use of these objects in proofs, rather than providing complete proofs of all major theorems. For example, a proof of a lemma that illustrates how objects are used would take precedence over the full proof of a well-known theorem

More information: This recent course handout (pdf) contains information about course objectives, assessment, course materials and the syllabus. 

Please note the following recent changes to the programs 3956 and 3962, in Applied Mathematics.

1.       From 2022 there will be 3 new courses:

  • MATH3051 to be offered in T3 every year. All students who will be doing level 3 in Applied Maths in 2022 and 2023 will be strongly advised to take this course as an elective course. From 2024 this course will be one of two core courses.
  • MATH3371/5371 to be offered in T1 every year
  • MATH3191/5191 to be offered in T3, alternate with MATH3171/5171

2.       From 2024 all level 3 students in Applied Maths should note that MATH3051 and MATH3041 will be one of two possible core courses.

The Online Handbook entry contains up-to-date timetabling information.

If you are currently enrolled in MATH3051, you can log into UNSW Moodle for this course.

Course aims

The course aims to provide students in Applied Mathematics with basic knowledge of Real Analysis and Functional Analysis, particularly topics that are useful for the study of many other Applied Mathematics courses.

Course description

The aim of this course is to provide students in Applied Mathematics with basic knowledge of Real Analysis and Functional Analysis, particularly topics that are useful for the study of many other Applied Mathematics courses. In any area of applied research, methods should not be learnt as a black box. Understanding the theory behind the methods requires some abstract mathematics, and this forms the contents of this course.